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Posts Tagged ‘Klostergården’

With a new beer book out, there are promotional activities which I generally enjoy. Sure sitting down in a bookshop to sign a hundred copies is a bit tiring, but I also get to meet people who are seriously interested in beer,

As the book is focused on Trøndelag, the central region in Norway, I had to travel there. It’s the area where I grew up, though I have lived in Oslo for mamy years.

The main launch event was at the E.C. Dahls brewery in Trondheim, with both beer people, family and friends and the book trade in attendance.

Last week I went back again to meet two groups who had invited me to come and visit them.

Norbrew is the Norwerian home brewers’ assosication, and they have an annual event at Klostergården, a lovely place on a tiny island in the Trondheim fjord. Klostergården is a B&B, cafe and brewery, and has splendid food and beer. I addition, the home brewers brought along some of their best beers for the others to taste, and the level was very high.

Klostergården

Norbrew invites an external lecturer every year, this year I had the honor. My presentation was based on a number of illustrations in the book, but I also raised some questions left unanswered in my research. We had a very good discussion afterwards, and the whole weekend was good fun.

The other group was Dahls Ølet Venner, a sort of fan club for the E C Dahls brewery. This is a group of men, mostly retired, with relations to the brewery going back several decades. Most of them have worked for the brewery in various functions.

There was a very warm welcome in ths group as well, and I had tailored my presentation to the audience, showing lots of ads and promotional material from the vaults. The group has their own club house in the attic of the brewery, and they have rescued a number of historical items. There has been a brewery in the building for 120 years, som there is quite some heritage to take care of.

Malt mill from 1901

I had brought an extra suitcase filled with books – but I ran out of them on this last evening. I was happy to return to Oslo with orders for another dozen books!

A merry crowd in the Dahls attic.

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9788202517465

 

There is no lack of beer books, even in Norwegian. Some retell the old tales, some are national versions of multilingual books. But, once in a while, something genuinely unique comes along.

Author Lars Marius Garshol (disclaimer: I am proud to call him my friend, even though I have not been involved in this project) is a well-known name in beer circles. He has been blogging in English for a dozen years, illustrated with his excellent photos, sharing intelligent journalism and analysis.

He has also done an amazing job documenting Lithuanian traditional brewing, in spite of linguistic challenges, resulting in a self-published book in English – Lithuanian Beer – A Rough Guide.

But now he has looked closer to home, where there are other treasures to be documented. The result is just out: the book Gårdsøl –literally Farmhouse Ale.

Some of his source material has been published before, but mostly in obscure and long out of print publications. More important, he manages to tell the story both on the micro and the macro level. This is done by alternating the style of the chapters of the book between journalism/participant observation and historical or other scientific overviews.

Lars Marius manages to convey his great enthusiasm for the brewers he meets and the traditions they share with him. And while the broader picture is well written and educational, it is the living tradition, often spiced with local dialect words that illustrate the process, that makes this book really shine.

The book gives an overview of brewing in various parts of the country, climatic conditions and traditions vary widely. Norway has a tough climate, and wheat was never an important crop until very recently. That means that barley and oats were important for food in most of the country, and in lean times there was not much left for brewing.

The book is richly illustrated, both by diagrams of brewing processes and the author’s photographs. This visualizes both what he observes today and it gives the opportunity to show old brew houses, beautiful drinking vessels and more.

If you want to try brewing in the traditional way, or at least get inspired by it, there is plenty of documentation for that as well.

Two important aspects of Norwegian traditional brewing have been kept alive in different parts of the country, both described in detail in the book.

One of them can be found in the fjords and valleys of the Western coast, with a epicenter at Voss – kveik. These are local yeast strains, some of them in symbiosis with bacteria, which behave in mysterious ways. They work at high temperatures and give complex aromas in the beer.

The other is the malt of the Stjørdal region. Farmers grow their own barley and malt them in small scale malt houses. The malting takes place using smoke and heat from local alder wood, giving a pronounced smoky flavor to the beer.

Could I ask for more? The original manuscript was much longer than the published book, so perhaps a directors cut as an e-book sometime in the future?

And yes, this important part of the Norwegian brewing heritage also calls for an English edition. But, knowing the author, he probably wouldn’t want anyone else to translate it. We’ll have to wait and see. Meanwhile, check out his blog, where there is a lot of information to be found in English.

And maybe we’ll do a blog collab about the commercially available beers using stjørdalsmalt or kveik, Lars Marius?

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