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Archive for the ‘brewing’ Category

As well as blogging, I also hang around various other beer sites. In Scandinavia, we tend to go for RateBeer rather than Beer Advocate, and I am approaching Norwegian beer rating number 1000 on RB. I am not much of a ticker any more, but I enjoy following the Norwegian scene.

There are new beers every week now, and I do not pay good money for beers from breweries that tend to let me down. So I could have reached this milestone before.

But which one to pick for the big number?

It could have been a beer from one of the forerunners of the Norwegian craft scene. Nøgne Ø, Haandbryggeriet, Ægir, Kinn or Lervig. One of the stars rapidly building a name like Austmann, Voss or Lindheim. A beer from one of my favourite brewpubs, Trondhjems Mikrobryggeri, Crowbar or Schouskjelleren.

But I picked Fjellbryggeriet Lun, a brown ale from a newcomer. They have made things even more difficult by going for the supermarket segment, staying below 4.7% ABV.

Lovely notes of roasted grain. Nuts, malt, coffee and chocolate. Clean and elegant. A most impressive beer from a new kid on the block. Well, they are new as commercial brewers. But their home page tells the story – 13 years as home brewers. So this is probably more than just beginner’s luck…

And located in the middle of the moutnains of Southern Norway, they also  fill in one of the blanks of the Norwegian beer map.

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Belgian flag

I had to rearrange the schedule of my day job this Easter. In Norway, this is serious vacation time. Many take the whole week off, going skiing on the last patches of snow or opening their summer houses for the season.

I’ll be home most of the week. I was supposed to be on duty the week after Easter, but I received an email that made me change my plans.

Visit Flanders, the tourist promotion body for the Flemish-speaking part of Belgium, has invited 8 Scandinavian beer writers for a four day visit from 24 April.  Four Swedes, two Danes, two Norwegians.

We will be visiting cafes and restaurants, breweries and beer festivals.

Here are the breweries where we will make a stop:

  • Cantillon
  • Brasserie de la Senne
  • De Halve Maan
  • De Struise Brouwers
  • Brewery 3 Fonteinen
  • Brewery De Kroon
  • Hof Ten Dormaal
  • Domus

 

Full coverage here on the blog, but also on twitter, @KnutAl, and Facebook.

This is a part of what looks like a general push for Belgian beer tourism. The craft beer explosion has swept the globe, but Belgium has the whole range from historical styles saved in the nick of time to daring newcomers pushing the boundaries. In my nine years of beer blogging, I haven’t given Belgium its fair share of coverage – I’m very pleased to have the opportunity to remedy that.

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Over the years, I have written about the beer scene in many European countries, but I haven’t written very much about Belgium. Sure, I covered some places in Brussels and Brugges, but I am a novice compared to those who make annual visits and know both the back streets of Antwerp and the green country lanes of Payottenland.
I am happy to tell that I belong to a group of eight Scandinavian beer writers invited to a four-day visit to Belgium next month. More about the itinerary later.
I like to plan ahead, so I have already spent some time with google maps, guide books and other sources.  My guides to Belgium were a few years old, so I thought I’d check what’s available.
There are guide books of all shapes and sizes. With 3D drawings of palaces and museums, with pull out or fold-out-and-never-able-to-fold-back-again-maps. And there is a peculiar tradition among the guidebook publishers – they hide the publication date of the book as well as they can, fearing that they will be considered past their sell-by date.
But there are some real gems out there. On Amazon, there are scans of old and out of print books, I stumbled across Peeps at Many Lands: Belgium by George W. T.  Omond, published in 1909 and now in the public domain.
According to Wikipedia, the author was awarded the Order of the Crown for his books about Belgium. I have a nagging feeling that the Belgians did not read the books before giving him the award.
A few highlights:
…..This seems a dull and hard life, but the Flemings do not find it so. Like all Belgians, they are fond of amusement, and there is a great deal of dancing and singing, especially on holidays. Sunday is the chief holiday. They all go to church in the morning, and the rest of the day is given up to play. Unfortunately many of the older people drink too much. There are far too many public-houses. Any person who likes can open one on payment of a small sum of money to the Government. The result is that in many quite small villages, where very few people live, there are ten or twelve public-houses, where a large glass of beer is sold for less than a penny, and a glass of coarse spirits for about the same price. Most of the drinking is done on Sunday, and on Monday morning it is often difficult to get men to work. There are many, especially in the towns, who never work on Mondays. This is quite understood in Belgium, and people who know the country are pleased, and rather surprised, if an artisan who has promised to come and do something on a Monday morning keeps his word. Of course there are many sober work-people, and it is a rare thing to see a tipsy woman, much rarer than in England; but there is a great deal of drunkenness in Belgium.
…………………….
The rooms in these public-houses are pretty large, but they get dreadfully hot and stuffy. The constant laughing and talking, the music, and the scraping of feet on the sanded floor make an awful din. Then there are sometimes disputes, and the Flemings have a nasty habit of using knives when they are angry, so the dancing, which often goes on till two or three in the morning, is the least pleasant thing about these gatherings.

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Back in my old home town again, a few hours to spare. Two new beers at Trondhjem Mikrobryggeri, both of them keeping the high standard that they have those days, hoppy and well crafted. Later, I will have a chat with the guys running the pub and micro brewery at Studentersamfundet.

But I have heard rumours about beers from a new brewery available in a pub I’ve never visited. Though the place is very familiar. This building used to house a temperance hotel and cafeteria on one of the busiest street corners in town, Prinsenkrysset. Those days are gone, and it makes perfect sense to have a pub here, a very convenient place to meet.

Irish theme pubs is not an endangered species, and at first sight Cafe Dublin is no different. Pub grub, which seemed a bit pricey, beer engines with the usual suspects.

But when I talk to the man behind the bar, I recognise that he sim more committed than most. He has some bottles from the Rein brewery in the fridge, he has the O’haras Leann Follain from Carlow, an excellent Irish stout I’ve never spotted anywhere in Norway before. Austmann beers in bottles and on tap, too. The temperatures in the fridges have even been turend up for the more interesting beers.

It is not my favourite beer bar in Trondheim. But it is certainly worth looking in if you are passing by. Live music in the evening.

I haven’t learned to use my new camera yet, so no decent photos of the facilities.

The Reins beer? Not quite there. Going organic is not enough.

Reins Ale No 23

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I’m going through a period when the blog posts are more infrequent, but that does not mean that the Norwegian micro breweries are slowing down.

There are newcomers every month, my current estimate is 80 active breweries before Easter. Some are doing very well, their main headache is how to expand their capacity. Others are more a paid hobby, but they are cheered on by their local communities and newspapers. Even the supermarket chains allow more local products on their shelves in places where there were no outlets.

I am not terribly impressed by all the new ones. I think we will reach a saturation point for pale ales at 4.7% ABV at 50 kroner per bottle very soon. Yes, there is a segment in the market willing to pay a premium price for premium beer. But, frankly, everything out there is not of premium quality. Some have serious quality problems. Others are bland. And even the industrial brewers are waking up, launching top fermented ales.

But there are some rising stars, too. I would particularly point to Lindheim, a farmhouse brewery located in rural Telemark. So far I have only seen their beers on tap, but I assume they go for a broader distribution. They have already made collaboration brews with big names like Port Brewing and Lost Abbey, som they are definitely aiming for the big league.

Speaking of collaborations, they are happening everywhere. Haand/Närke, Lervig/Magic Rock, Austmann/Amundsen, Amundsen/Crowbar….

But the most important trend now is going back to the roots of Norwegian brewing. The key word is local malt, particularly from the Stjørdal region. There are already a few beers out, expect more to come during the year. These will cover a broad range from mild ales with just a hint of smoked malt added to robust ales filled with smoke and tar. Beers to look out for are Alstadberger, brewed in cooperation with Klostergården, Bøkerøkt form Larvik, Ørderøl from To Tårn and beers to be launched this week by Stjørdalsbryggeriet.

We are talking about beers with a pedigree going back through the centuries, when farmers grew their own barley and processed this into beer for Christmas, for funerals, weddings and baptisms. We have been lucky that a handful of farmers have kept this tradition alive.

Larvik To Taarn bottles

As smoky as it gets

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Sorry.

No time for writing up any comprehensive blog posts on pubs, beer shops or the general feeling of being back in London in December once more.

It was a nice unpretentious weekend with two mates, and, while we tried to cover quite a few pubs, we did not aim for a maximum number of beers or breweries. The choice is staggering compared the London I used to know, perhaps I’ll try to come back and cover it better in the future. And our Facebook friends got live coverage the weekend we were there….

So, just a few highlights:

The London Fields brewery tap.

After passing two pubs that did not open until four in the afternoon, this was a great place to end up. Nine beers on tap, including some one-offs, and you get 1/3 pint samplers at a reasonable price. Industrial/punk style, concrete, glass and plywood. There are windows between the tap room and the brewery. Relaxed on a Friday afternoon. Good beers, we particularly noted that the quality was consistent across the range. Impressive from a newcomer.

A return visit to the Cask Pub and Kitchen, good food and a great range of beers. A Saturday evening  visit to the sister establishment, Craft Clapham, which was quite insane. It was the night after opening, and it was packed with Christmas partying. The beer was, however, excellent, with inventive brews far beyond what English beer used to be . A Berliner Weisse from Magic Rock is a good indicator.

Some good Fuller’s pubs in West London, the highlight being the canal side Union Tavern.  If you didn’t know this was a Fuller’s House, you would not guess it. It is really a sign of the changing times that there is a fine range of beers from several London breweries available. And the setting by the Grand Union Canal must be spectacular in the summer. Just a few minutes from Westbourne Park tube station.

CASKdec2013

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I am not doing a year in review thing this year, just catching up on a few things I never got around to covering.

While staying in Antibes in July, there was some interest in getting away from the beach and doing some sightseeing. As there was a tiny principality with good train connections about an hour away, we decided Monaco was the place to go. And as I had thought about this beforehand, I knew where we were going for lunch.

Brasserie de Monaco is on the waterfront, with fine views of the yachts of the rich and, presumably, famous. Considering the surroundings, it is a inexpensive place to lunch, and the local tarts and cheeses from the snacks menu were really good. Those of the company who ordered burgers seemed content, too.

The beers? Three of their own brews on tap when I visited, nicely presented in sampler glasses. A wit, an amber and a pils. the amber claiming to be the honey ale brewed at the White House. Rather bland stuff.

I’m sure there might be better beer bars in town, but I did not have time to look for them. You will want to sit down and relax at some point, and it is unlikely that you’ll find a better lunch at a reasonable price in the harbour area.

Easy to find, by the swimming pools.

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(English summary at the end)

Nu klinger igjennem den gamle stad på nye en studentersang

Og alle man alle i rekke og rad stemmer opp under begerets klang

foto.samfundet.no

Jeg vet ikke om Smørekoppens visebok fremdeles er i hevd i det runde hus på Elgeseter i Trondheim. Det som er sikkert er at man fremdeles har et stort hus som rommer mange aktiviteter, basert på ildsjeler som gjerne ofrer et semester eller to på det som skjer i Studentersamfundet.

Dette var en viktig del av min ungdom, og omfattet både polariserte politiske debatter, konserter med de beste navnene man klarte å få lokket så langt unna allfarvei (Edgar Broughton Band, anyone?) og rett og slett rangling. Stort sett med EC Dahls pils.

Det rangles nok fremdeles, men i dag har man enda flere skjenkesteder, og med et ølutvalg man virkelig kan være stolt av. I forbindelse med UKA pusser man opp ulike deler av huset, og denne gang var tiden kommet til puben i Daglighallen, som nå fremstår i lekker engelsk pubstil med en øltavle som rommer det meste av det interessante som er å skaffe på det norske markedet.

UKA er over, og det er eksamenstid, men bryggmester Ulrik Bjerkeli har likevel tatt seg tid til en prat, og ikke minst å fortelle om høstens tilvekst, Daglighallens eget mikrobryggeri.

Og her snakker vi om et virkelig mikrobryggeri, det er snakk om et oppskalert hjemmebryggeri. Det brygges 120 liter av gangen, og de første seks batchene solgte ut på tre uker, men det var i forbindelse med UKA. Man har nå kommet til batch 14, og har hatt en APA, en Black IPA, en English Brown, en Ordinary Bitter og en Saison på programmet. En liten smak på det som befinner seg i tankene viser at her har man kommet godt i gang.

Ulrik kan fortelle at han også tenker på å brygge lagerøl. Samfundet har åpent noen måneder hvert semester, men er stengt både rundt nyttår og på sommeren. Da har man jo gode muligheter til å prøve seg på lagerøl som kan være klart tils ervering når aktivitetene tar seg opp igjen. Det er tradisjonelt solgt mye bayer i huset, og man kunne jo prøve å ha et hjemmebrygget alternativ til det som leveres fra Ringnes.

Samfundet er i stor grad basert på frivillig innsats, og det gjør jo at det ølet som brygges i huset også kommer svært gunstig ut økonomisk i forhold til øl som kjøpes inn.

I tillegg til egne øl, har Daglighallen også en imponerende tavle med mye fristende fra både inn- og utland.

The Student Society in Trondheim is owned and run by ilts members, currently almost 9000 of them. They own a house close to the biggest university campus, which is host to a broad specter of cultural activities. There is also a number of cafes and bars in the building, and one of these, Daglighallen, has evolved into a beer pub with an impressive list. This autumn they have even started a micro brewery.

It is a very small scale operation, brewing 120 liter batches, covering a number of ale types. There are also plans to brew lagers, and the ambitions are there to brew stronger beers and letting them age before serving them.

The head brewer, Ulrik Bjerkeli, has a background as a home brewer, but he has also worked a bit for Austmann Bryggeri, getting a feeling of how things are done on a larger scale.

The brewery is run by volunteers, meaning that the profit margin for their home brews is much nicer than for the beers they buy from the outside. Something to consider for voluntary organsiations elsewhere?

I sampled a few of the beers, and I particularly liked their Saison. I hope to be back in the new year to try a full glass of each of the beers in their range.

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(English text at the end)

Vest for Trondheim sentrum går Bynesveien langs fjorden forbi gamle oljetankanlegg og andre industribygg. Dette har nok vært et naturskjønt område, men nå er det preget av mange tiår med nyttefunksjoner som ikke setter et så vakkert stempel på omgivelsene.

Skal du besøke Austmann bryggeri, er det lurt å ha gjort en avtale på forhånd. En litt dårlig merket avkjørsel ned mot fjorden ender i to stengte porter.

Jeg blir tatt godt imot av Anders Cooper og  Vinko Lien Sindelar.

Ved inngangen er det lager for flasker og fat, ved mitt besøk er det et svært begrenset utvalg. I begynnelsen av desember er det meningen at ølet skal være ute i hyller, kjøleskap og på kraner.

I neste rom står ølet og godgjør seg på 900-liters tanker, og innerst finner vi de tre åpne gjæringskarene. Utstyret er kjøpt fra Kinn, men er tilpasset en del. Gjæren høstes og brukes på nytt, og blir i stadig bedre form. Det blir naturligvis et overskudd av gjær, så her har trønderske hjemmebryggere gode muligheter.

Selv om Austmann bare har vært i drift siden i sommer, er det brygget et titall øl, og de fleste av dem er allerede å finne på polets bestillingsliste. Det er ikke sikkert at alle øltypene blir videreført, samtidig mangler det ikke på planer for neste år. Det finnes en kjelleretasje der det står noen kegs med imperial stout, og der vil det komme trefat av ulike slag for å lage surøl og annet spennende.  

De meste populære øltypene så langt har vært en belgisk ale, Tre gamle damer og Northumberland, en brown ale. For egen del vil jeg vel trekke frem Bastogne (saison) og Blåbærstout.

Så langt har salget gått bra, og med et etterlengtet flaskeanlegg (installert etter mitt besøk) vil det bli mindre slitsomt å dekke etterspørselen. Det er selvfølgelig vanskelig å beregne markedet før man setter i gang, og man er jo i stor grad låst til det utstyret man investerer i, i alle fall på kort sikt. Dagens lokaler har en del å gå på når det gjelder lagerplass, og utstyret gir mulighet for kontinuerlig brygging, eventuelt ved å dele uken i to skift.

Jeg skrev innledningsvis om at industriområdet ikke nødvendigvis er det mest idylliske. Samtidig er det et potensiale for å sette opp bord og benker og ha servering nede på kaien. Og derfra er det en praktfull utsikt mot Munkholmen og byen. Hvem vet, kanskje det kan gjøre som på the Kernel i London, der man møtes på mandag formiddag for å ta en øl og spise frokost?

Selv om du ikke har veien innom Trondheim, er det vel verdt å prøve øl fra Austmann. De fleste ølene deres er å få på polet, og det er bare å be din favorittpub om å ta inn fatøl fra dem også. Jeg tror dette er en av nykommerne som vil klare seg i et stadig tøffere marked.

Many of the new breweries in Norway start on a very small scale, peddling their beers to local shops or bars. Austmann bryggeri in Trondheim, established this summer, have bigger ambitions. With loans from family and friends and a distribution deal with Beer Enthusiast, they managed to get a number of their beers listed with the state Vinmonopolet,  meaning that they have a full national distribution.

The brewery is located in an industrial area not far from Central Trondheim with a nice view of the Trondheim fjord.

The beer range includes Belgian ales, a saison, a blueberry stout, two IPAs, an amber ale, a wheat ale and three Christmas beers. The best sellers will stay on, others will be replaced with new beers.

The bottled beers are vital for distribution in the Vinmonopolet shops, but key kegs are important for the pub market.

The beers are brewed in open vessels bought from Kinn brewery, and they are well worth trying out. As Beer Enthisiast are now establishing themselves in several other coutnries, that might mean that some of their beers could turn up, at least in Sweden.

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There’s a room in a house in a street in a manor in a borough
That’s part of a city that is generally referred to as London
It’s a dark place, a mysterious place
And it is said that if you’re born within the sound of Bow-Bells
You have the necessary qualifications to be christened a Londoner
[It's a cruel place, it's a hard place]
But when you think back to all the great Londoners
William Blake, Charles Dickens, Dick Whittington,
Pearly kings, barrow boys, Arthur Daley, Max Wall
And don’t forget the Kray twins.

Ray Davies –London Song

I make no claim to have the necessary qualifications to be christened a Londoner. But I used to visit London at least annually.

A week every year.

For decades.

I explored the city. On foot, by bus, by tube. I went on guided walks, I bought guidebooks.

I explored the pubs in number of boroughs, usually sticking to Young’s Special or Fuller’s London Pride.

But times changed. There were pubs with a broader range of beers. There were beer festivals. Utobeer and the Rake offered exiting American import beers. BrewDog entered the scene. Young’s disappeared.

The last four years I have only visited once. I have tried to follow the developments, but I cannot claim to have my finger on the beer pulse of London the way I used to.

Time to do something about that. Time for a pre-Christmas visit. In particular, it is time to get so know some of the dozens of new London breweries that have emerge over the last few years. Many of them are clustered in East London. Hackney seems like the centre of gravity right now. And my research shows that on the weekend I am in town, there are two events in the area worth visiting in addition to breweries, pubs and brewpubs.

There are four of us from Oslo going to London for an oval weekend. The other three have more knowledge of beer and brewing than I do. But I know a thing or two about advance planning.

We are talking Friday 6 December, starting at lunchtime. Anyone is welcome to join, get in touch about more exact timing.

Start: Old Street Tube Station.

Or Shoreditch High Street, if that’s more convenient.

There used to be a rather good beer shop around here some years ago, carrying the Pitfield range of beers brewed to classic English recipes. That’s history.

But we have a good alternative. The first stop is a something really special. A pop up beer shop.

The Wanstead Tap is a moveable feast,  selling beers at festivals, farmer’s markets and other event. It  has settled for two weeks in 87 Leonard Street in Shoretditch.

As far as I can understand, the concept is simple: Bottled beers from the London breweries. According to the East London and West Sussex Guardian, this is a case of true love for beer: A father of two has given up a successful career in television to dedicate his time to promoting beers brewed locally. I have already asked him to reserve something specialfor me. Have a look at the Facebook page if you are looking for something out of the ordinary..

I haven’t been to any of the BrewDog bars yet, and BrewDog Shoreditch is just up the road. 51 Bethnal Green Road. Maybe a swift one? www.brewdog.com

 

The question is if the Redchuch Brewery on 275-276 Poyser Street is worth a detour? I may be convinced. On the other hand, their beers might be available later in the day, too.

I think we will jump on a bus going north. Just before the road crosses the Regent’s Canal, the first brewery of the day is Hackney Brewery, just to the left. in Laburnum St. They don’t seem to be open to the public, but I have e-mailed them.

The next stop is across the Canal. It used to be the home of Beawertown Brewery, but they have moved on. But Duke’s Brew and Que is still the brewery tap. And, dangerously, they have around ten of their beers on keg or cask. Not to mention bottles.

I think I’ll have a Bloody ‘Ell Blood Orange IPA.  

Adress: 33 Downham Road, De Beauvoir Town

After this it is probably sensible that we strech our legs, and our next target seems to be about a kilometre due east. Perhaps we will walk along the towpath.

London Fields Brewery has a core range of session beers and more challenging stuff in their Bootlegger Series.
The brewery and brewery tap: 365-366 Warburton Street. Gift packs of beers to take away are available.

If the weather and overall condition is up to it, we can continue walking. The alternative is to get on a bus along Mare Street towards Central Hackney.

Pressure Drop Brewing is located in a railway arch, but don’t have a brewery tap. I think we’ll have a fair chance of sampling some of their beers in the Cock Tavern, which I seem to recall as a rather grim establishment in its previous incarnation, but presumably gentrified along with the rest of the area. According to the Craft Beer App, there are chances of us finding beers from the otherwise elusive Happy Collie brewery from West London there. And, conveniently, the Cock Tavern has its very own Howling Hops Brewery at the premises. 315 Mare Street.

Just a few minutes away, Five Points Brewing is close to London Fields station. I thought I would e-mail them to ask them if they want visitors. But I don’t think we will be up to a serious presentation of a brewery at this stage.

It’s dark by now. But the Pembury Tavern, across the street, is like a beacon. It is actually the only stop on the route that I have visited before. 16 hand pumps, including a fine range from the Milton brewery. 90 Armhurst Road.

The sensible thing now is to return to wherever we came from. Eat some junk food and go to sleep. But there is a beer festival. The City and East End CAMRA Pig’s Ear Festival. With lots of one off beers from London breweries. It’s in an old chapel (!) in Powerscroft Road. Lots of friendly natives. Come on. Just for a pint?

London Beers listed for the festival include brews from

  • Beavertown
  • Belleville
  • Brew by Numbers
  • Brew Wharf
  • Brodies
  • By the Horns
  • Clarkshaw’s
  • Crate
  • East London
  • Five Points
  • Fourpure
  • Hackney
  • Howling Hops,
  • Kernel
  • London Brewing
  • London Fields
  • Moncada
  • Partizan
  • Pressure Drop
  • Redchurch
  • Redemption
  • Strawman
  • Tap East
  • Truman’s
  • Weird Beard
  • White Hart
  • Wild Card.

That makes 27. And, while there is no way to know which beers are on at any given time, there should be enough for even the most enthusiastic ticker.

Even the affectingly mentioned Pitfield from the beginning of this ramble is listed with a few beers. They have made festival one offs for Pig’s Ear for many years, now they are being brewed somewhere in the countryside.

The festival will also commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Society for the Preservation of Beers from the Wood, which advocates the use of wooden barrels as part of British beer heritage.  Several wooden casks will be featured, including a one-off anniversary special 7% classic Red Ale brewed by award-winning Cambridge Moonshine Brewery.

There is food available at a number of the pubs on the route, I suppose we will be snacking along the way rather than sitting down for a proper meal. Scotch eggs, crisps and beer cover most of the basic food groups.

 

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